Posted 3 months ago

ilovecharts:

The World Cup

via Kurt White

A quick summary of the World Cup in graphic form!

(Source: ohdios.net)

Posted 3 months ago
Posted 3 months ago

fastcompany:

Seven of this year’s Forty Over 40 Women to Watch honorees share how innovation improves with age.

Red wine. Cheese. Innovation. Yes, these are all things that get better with age. Don’t believe it? Science offers some pretty compelling evidence that wunderkinds are the exception, rather than the rule.

One researcher found that Nobel Prize winners’ age around a significant breakthrough is about 38 (and not recognized until they’re 60) and another posits that a lifetime of learning leads to greater breakthroughs between ages 55-65. Data from the Kauffmann Foundation bears this out as findings indicate people over 55 are almost twice as likely to found successful companies than those between 20 and 34.

These statistics are seldom recognized, much less celebrated, in a youth obsessed culture, according to Whitney Johnson, author and cofounder of investment firm Rose Park Advisors. That’s why she and Christina Vuleta, founder of Women’s career advice forum 40:20 Vision, took matters into their own hands.

They started an initiative, dubbed Forty Over 40 in 2013 to change the idea that mid-life means you’re on the down side of over-the-hill. This year’s honorees range from 40 to over 60 and come from a variety of industries including the arts, law, retail, health care, and tech. Each has an impressive resume, not limited to an accumulation of greater titles and industry accolades.

As Johnson writes, “At age 40 we’re just getting to the best part. After spending years on the low end of the S-curve of experience, we are now ready to accelerate into a sweet spot of competence and contribution.”

With that in mind, we asked several of this year’s honorees to share their thoughts on aging, disruption, and transitions. Here’s what they told us.

Read More>

Posted 3 months ago

fastcompany:

Infographic: Every Trip To The Moon, Ever

Who remembered that we’d gotten it wrong so many times?

Once the U.S. planted a flag on the moon, it was easy to forget the trials and tribulations of the space race. But did you know that the United States and Soviet Union combined for eight failed missions to the moon within a single year? Eventually, the U.S. got the Pioneer 4 (their fifth attempt) to do a successful flyby in 1959. The Soviet Union followed a few months later by topping us big time—they actually landed with their Luna 2, a probe that looks straight out of 1960s sci-fi television. It’s a story that you can follow in this pair of infographics created by Margot Trudell as part of her OCAD graduate thesis.

Read More>

Posted 3 months ago

One Thing New - Dress, Perfected

Posted 3 months ago

msnbc:

Lucy Flores was born into an impoverished family of 13 children, abandoned by her mother in grade school, fell into a gang, was sentenced to youth prison, and dropped out of high school. Now, she’s a lawyer and legislator, and currently running for Lieutenant Governor of Nevada. 

“There are Lucys in every town across this state. That’s why my focus is on making sure that this is a state that works for every Nevadan, not just the privileged few.”

Read msnbc’s exclusive profile of rising political star Lucy Flores.

Posted 3 months ago
shortformblog:

fastcodesign:

Kids who could identify golden arches and other junk food logos had higher BMIs than their brand-ignorant peers, researchers found.
A new study shows that young children who are familiar with unhealthy food branding—McDonald’s golden arches, Trix’s silly rabbit, Burger King’s crown—are more likely to be overweight than their brand-ignorant peers. Studies show that people who are overweight in childhood tend to stay that way. 

The researchers tested two groups of three- to five-year-olds on their knowledge of fast food and processed food brands like McDonald’s, Burger King, Coke, Pepsi, Fritos, and Doritos. They found that those who could correctly identify the sugar-and-grease-mongering logos tended to have higher body mass indexes (BMIs). “We found the relationship between brand knowledge and BMI to be quite robust,” said Anna McAlister, an MSU assistant professor of advertising and public relations who was a member of the research team.
Read More>

In other words, if advertising works well, it works too well.

shortformblog:

fastcodesign:

Kids who could identify golden arches and other junk food logos had higher BMIs than their brand-ignorant peers, researchers found.

A new study shows that young children who are familiar with unhealthy food branding—McDonald’s golden arches, Trix’s silly rabbit, Burger King’s crown—are more likely to be overweight than their brand-ignorant peers. Studies show that people who are overweight in childhood tend to stay that way

image

The researchers tested two groups of three- to five-year-olds on their knowledge of fast food and processed food brands like McDonald’s, Burger King, Coke, Pepsi, Fritos, and Doritos. They found that those who could correctly identify the sugar-and-grease-mongering logos tended to have higher body mass indexes (BMIs). “We found the relationship between brand knowledge and BMI to be quite robust,” said Anna McAlister, an MSU assistant professor of advertising and public relations who was a member of the research team.

Read More>

In other words, if advertising works well, it works too well.

Posted 3 months ago
futurehorizons:

Meet Dr. Temple Grandin and hear her speak on autism in Nashville on her birthday, August 29! Click here for details and registration.

futurehorizons:

Meet Dr. Temple Grandin and hear her speak on autism in Nashville on her birthday, August 29Click here for details and registration.

Posted 3 months ago

sci-universe:

This pen-device lets you draw every single color in the world.
Scribble
matches hues and transfers them onto paper or a mobile device. The pen is armed with a 16-bit RGB color sensor that stores the colors you tell it to.

Posted 3 months ago

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Miyoko Ihara

Misao the Big Mama and Fukumaru the Cat

If you love a good cat photo, Miyoko Ihara's images of her grandmother and beloved cat will not disappoint you. From working in the fields to taking naps, these two are inseparable. Ihara not only explores the amazing bond between human and animal, but also tells the story of her elderly grandmother's life in Japan and the daily tasks she pursues. These images can be found in the beautiful book “Miyoko Ihara: Misao the Big Mama and Fukumaru the Cat.”

text by Anna Capurso