Posted 1 month ago

howstuffworks:

tedx:

awkwardsituationist:

photos of butterfly and moth wings taken by linden gledhil at seven to ten times life size.

"evolution is written on the wings of butterflies" - charles darwin

Spectacular. We’re reminded of this talk from butterfly expert Peter Smetacek on the relationship between butterflies and rivers in India. Watch the whole talk here»

Read more about How Butterflies Work, including their wings and scales.

Posted 1 month ago

dfernews:

Happy Women’s History Month!

Posted 1 month ago

thekidshouldseethis:

We just tried this super easy Reversing Arrow Illusion, and it is, in fact, super easy. Draw two left-pointing arrows on a piece of paper and then put a clear, empty glass between you and those arrows. When you pour water into the glass, you’ll see something that you might not expect. How exactly did that happen? From Physics Central

No, you aren’t going crazy and you haven’t found yourself with Alice in Wonderland staring at arrows pointing in opposite directions.  In fact, you have just demonstrated a physics concept called refraction, the bending of light.

When the arrow is moved to a particular distance behind the glass, it looks like it reversed itself. When light passes from one material to another, it can bend or refract. In the experiment that you just completed, light traveled from the air, through the glass, through the water, through the back of the glass, and then back through the air, before hitting the arrow. Anytime that light passes from one medium, or material, into another, it refracts.

Just because light bends when it travels through different materials, doesn’t explain why the arrow reverses itself.  To explain this, you must think about the glass of water as if it is a magnifying glass. When light goes through a magnifying glass the light bends toward the center. Where the light all comes together is called the focal point, but beyond the focal point the image appears to reverse because the light rays that were bent pass each other and the light that was on the right side is now on the left and the left on the right, which makes the arrow appear to be reversed.

Related mind-benders: the amazing T-Rex illusiona basic demonstration of optical cloaking, and from ASAPscience, Can you trust your eyes?

via The Awesomer.

Posted 1 month ago
Posted 1 month ago
centerofmath:

In anticipation of Pi Day, here’s a Pi joke!!

Stay tuned for our Pi Day article coming soon!

centerofmath:

In anticipation of Pi Day, here’s a Pi joke!!

Stay tuned for our Pi Day article coming soon!

Posted 1 month ago

theatlanticcities:

In the 1930s and 1940s, the executives behind Muzak — the bland background noise piped into hotel lobbies, malls, and elevators — adopted a slogan touting their social engineering capabilities: “Muzak While You Work for Increased Efficiency.” A carefully calibrated playlist with increasing tempo promised to make factory workers more productive, while slower, easy-listening tunes claimed to encourage shoppers to take their time.

"I found all that kind of sinister," jokes Yowei Shaw. A freelance public radio reporter and producer by training, Shaw has been grappling with questions of engaging listeners in public spaces as part of her residency with the Philadelphia-based Asian Arts Initiative’s Social Practice Lab. Muzak’s social engineering history, she says, gave her an idea: “What if we could make our own kind of elevator music, but do it with pro-social intentions, to promote community?”

And so her project, Really Good Elevator Music, was born. Shaw asked six local musicians from Philly’s Chinatown North/Callowhill neighborhood to produce tracks that would help “foster community” in the area. The result is the 13 track album of “really good elevator music,” which is playing in the elevators of the nearby, mixed-use Wolf Building for the month of March.

-Elevator Music You Actually Want To Listen To

Posted 1 month ago
Posted 1 month ago

theatlantic:

Veronica Mars: One of TV’s Realest Depictions of Wealth Inequality

Imagine a city that’s home to gaggles of tech millionaires, massive Internet-company IPOs, a housing crisis, and palpable tension between the wealthy inhabitants jacking up prices and everybody else just trying to keep their place.

Judging by recent headlines, that sounds a bit like San Francisco and Silicon Valley. But it’s actually Neptune, the fictional SoCal beach town that served as the setting for teen-detective noir Veronica Mars. The beloved series ran for three seasons before low ratings led to its 2007 cancellation, but this Friday, almost one year after a historic, multimillion-dollar Kickstarter campaign gave it new life, Veronica Mars returns to the big screen. (Or small screen, if you prefer—the film will be available in on-demand formats for cautious newcomers or fans who prefer their Friday nights at home.)

Read more. [Image: The CW]

Posted 1 month ago
It was a damn good speech—unequivocal, ungrudging, and stern. That it was delivered by a Republican governor in a Republican state—and delivered with every sign of sincerity, even passion—is simply the latest astonishment in an astonishing American revolution.
Hendrik Hertzberg on Governor Jan Brewer’s statement vetoing Arizona’s anti-gay bill: http://nyr.kr/1hDegWA (via newyorker)
Posted 1 month ago

she-works:

JL, Raleigh, NC

We want to hear from women: What’s your note to self – a piece of advice that’s helped you at work? Share your advice at http://she-works.tumblr.com